My 1st Number 8 Typhoon

 

"Typhoon Watching" is my new object of interest now. For the first time of my life, I get to "see, hear and feel" a Typhoon Number 8. One thing about typhoon – Beside the very big wind, the weather is very very unstable. The sun, rain and wind come and go in a very unpredictable manner. At one minute, you see clear sky. The next, the rain poured so heavy that you can’t see what’s opposite. The sea water turned colours – dark blue to green to grey. It is like watching Mother Nature doing her own Colours Symphony.
I am now typing this blog at home – it is Warning Sign Number 8 (so no work for the moment). My clients from Malaysia are stranded at their hotel. We called each other this morning at 8am to postpone our 11am meeting. Like myself, my Malaysian counterpart is clueless about the "whats and ifs". We are all waiting for the Typhoon to be downgraded before deciding when to meet.
The warning signs came yesterday. At 12pm, there were signboards at our lift lobby displaying "T1". When I went home last night, the signboards displayed "T3". This characters appeared on their TV (like our NS mobilisation icon). This morning at 8am, it displayed "T8" (so it means no work! ~ or it means work even later tonight!).

 

Naming a Typhoon – Fun facts:

Before 2000, most typhoons were named by those meteorlogists who identified them. Usually, they named it after their wives, girlfriends or mothers. (I guess the rough weather reminds them of their female counterparts!) Luckily for all the ladies, as of 1st Jan 2000, the members of WMO Typhoon Committee (nations and cities) contribute generic names for all the future typhoon. Through a roster-format, the meteorlogists have a standard naming guideline what to name the next typhoon. It is no longer "personal names" – you find names of flower, animals in different languages.

If you look at the roster (for North Pacific Regions only) below, you be able to know what’s the name of the next typhoon. (So, it is Typhoon Kanmuri now).

Contributing Nation

Names

Cambodia

Damrey

Kong-rey

Nakri

Krovanh

Sarika

China

Haijui

Yutu

Fengshen

Dujuan

Haima

DPR Korea

Kirogi

Toraji

Kalmaegi

Mujigae

Meari

Hong Kong, China

Kai-Tak

Man-yi

Fung-wong

Choi-wan

Ma-on

Japan

Tembin

Usagi

Kanmuri

Koppu

Tokage

Lao PDR

Bolaven

Pabuk

Phanfone

Ketsana

Nock-ten

Macau

Sanba

Wutip

Vongfong

Parma

Muifa

Malaysia

Jelawat

Sepat

Nuri

Melor

Merbok

Micronesia

Ewinlar

Fitow

Sinlaku

Nepartak

Nanmadol

Philippines

Malaksi

Danas

Hagupit

Lupit

Talas

RO Korea

Gaemi

Nari

Jangmi

Mirinae

Noru

Thailand

Prapiroon

Wipha

Mekkhala

Nida

Kulap

U.S.A.

Maria

Francisco

Higos

Omais

Roke

Vietnam

Son-Tinh

Lekima

Bavi

Conson

Sonca

Cambodia

Bopha

Krosa

Maysak

Chanthu

Nesat

China

Wukong

Haiyan

Haishen

Dianmu

Haitang

DPR Korea

Sonamu

Podul

Noul

Mindule

Nalgae

Hong Kong, China

Shanshan

Lingling

Dolphin

Lionrock

Banyan

Japan

Yagi

Kajiki

Kujira

Kompasu

Washi

Lao PDR

Leepi

Faxai

Chan-hom

Namtheun

Pakhar

Macau

Bebinca

Peipan

Linfa

Malou

Sanvu

Malaysia

Rumbia

Tapah

Nangka

Meranti

Mawar

Micronesia

Soulik

Mitag

Soudelor

Fanapi

Guchol

Philippines

Cimaron

Hagibis

Molave

Malakas

Talim

RO Korea

Jebi

Neoguri

Goni

Megi

Doksuri

Thailand

Mankhut

Rammasun

Morakot

Chaba

Khanun

U.S.A.

Utor

Matmo

Etau

Aere

Vicete

Vietnam

Trami

Halong

Vamco

Songda

Saola

Too bad, Singapore isn’t on this list (and we know why). If we are ever on this list, you will find names like Typhoon Kiasu, Typhoon PCK, Typhoon Ah Beng, Typhoon Raffles, Typhoon LiuLian, Typhoon Ninabeh, Typhoon CheeHong, Typhoon Laksa and my favourite "Typhoon PAP".

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